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  • Writer's picturePriyanka Goswami

Food protein induced enterocolitis


Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES) is a rare, non-IgE-mediated food allergy that affects infants and young children. It typically develops within the first few months of life after the introduction of solid foods. The symptoms of FPIES usually include vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration, which can lead to severe complications such as hypovolemic shock and metabolic acidosis.

Causes:

The exact cause of FPIES is unknown, but it is thought to be related to an abnormal immune response to certain foods. The most common triggers for FPIES are cow's milk, soy, rice, oat, and egg, although many other foods have also been reported to cause FPIES, including chicken, turkey, fish, and shellfish.

Diagnosis:

The diagnosis of FPIES is based on a thorough clinical evaluation and a detailed medical history. Laboratory tests such as blood tests or skin prick tests are usually negative in FPIES, which can make diagnosis more difficult. In some cases, an oral food challenge may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment:

The main treatment for FPIES is the avoidance of trigger foods. If a trigger food is accidentally ingested, treatment may include intravenous fluids, electrolyte replacement, and in severe cases, hospitalization. Some children may outgrow FPIES over time, but this can vary depending on the specific trigger food.

Statistical information:

The prevalence of FPIES is not well established, but it is thought to be rare, affecting approximately 0.3% of children. Cow's milk and soy are the most common trigger foods for FPIES, accounting for approximately 70% of cases. Other common trigger foods include rice (16%), oat (10%), and egg (9%). Less common trigger foods include chicken, turkey, fish, and shellfish.

In conclusion, FPIES is a rare, non-IgE-mediated food allergy that can be difficult to diagnose due to negative laboratory tests. The main treatment is the avoidance of trigger foods, and if accidental ingestion occurs, prompt medical attention is necessary. Cow's milk and soy are the most common trigger foods for FPIES, but many other foods have also been reported to cause the condition.

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